Training Requirements for Speech-language Pathologists

Speech-language pathologists need a master's degree.

Degrees for Speech-language pathologists
Percent
Less than High School 0.1
High School 0.9
Some College 0.6
Associates Degree 1.1
Bachelors Degree 11.7
Masters Degree 82.6
Doctorate or Professional Degree 3.0

Employment Outlook for Speech-language Pathologists

This represents about 135,000 people in the United States.

Over the next 10 years there will be aproximately 28,000 more speech-language pathologists but, because of expected growth and replacement needs in the United States, we will need 63,000 more.

Typical Income for Speech-language Pathologists

Hourly Income

On average,speech-language pathologists make $37.60 per hour.

Bottom 10% Bottom 25% Median Top 75% Top 90%
Speech-language pathologists $22.63 $28.12 $35.90 $45.67 $56.16
Healthcare practitioners and technical occupations $15.59 $21.80 $30.49 $43.83 $64.87
Health diagnosing and treating practitioners $23.60 $28.74 $37.49 $53.60 $84.62
Therapists $22.12 $28.11 $36.07 $45.37 $54.98
National Average $9.27 $11.60 $17.81 $28.92 $45.45

Annual Salaries

On average, speech-language pathologists make $78,210 per year.

Bottom 10% Bottom 25% Median Top 75% Top 90%
Speech-language pathologists $47,070 $58,480 $74,680 $95,000 $116,810
Healthcare practitioners and technical occupations $32,430 $45,330 $63,420 $91,180 $134,930
Health diagnosing and treating practitioners $49,090 $59,780 $77,980 $111,480 $176,020
Therapists $46,000 $58,470 $75,020 $94,360 $114,360
National Average $19,290 $24,140 $37,040 $60,150 $94,540

This data is from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics

Speech-language Pathologists: What Is This Career Like?

I work with children from ages 2 and up (generally just through elementary school but mostly preschool ages), on speech and language impairments. Children may only have a developmental delay in their speech and/or language, with all other aspects of their life being normal, or they may have a primary diagnosis such as Autism or Down's Syndrome to deal with also. I work on articulation (speech sounds), receptive language which includes ability to follow directions, understanding word meanings spoken to them, and understanding meaning and purpose of questions (to name a few), and expressive language which is the ability to use language to communicate wants/needs, to use parts of speech correctly, and to verbalize answers to questions appropriately (again to name a few). In addition to working with the child, I do parent and teacher education regarding a child's functioning, their needs, and how these others can facilitate progress between therapy sessions.

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